Fried Artichoke Recipe

Our fried artichoke recipe treats globe artichokes as a delicacy or appetiser.

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Rather than waiting for enough artichokes to ripen for a main meal, we pick our artichokes when they are at their best size for eating. Our fried artichoke recipe is an ideal way of sharing a small crop of artichokes amongst friends and family.

Globe artichokes are easy to grow. They are a perennial, and a member of the thistle family, so apart from weeding around the base of the plant they require very little care and attention. Like broccoli, the part of the plant that is eaten is the flower bud. When the bud is about the size of a tennis ball it is ready for picking.

Ingredients – Fried Artichokes

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For more recipe ideas you may like to see our article on allotment recipe books.

How To Make Fried Artichokes

The part of the artichoke that is eaten is the inner white heart. To get to this, the outer leaves that wrap it need to be removed, but you will know the heart when you see it because of the creamy white flesh. The artichoke also needs to be topped and tailed to remove the stiff and chewy base and any flower thistles.

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Once the artichoke heart has been revealed, speed is of the essence. Like an apple, but faster, the flesh of the artichoke blackens when exposed to air. The artichoke needs to be chopped into quarters, then quickly transferred to a frying pan. If need be, fully immerse the hearts in water to prevent them blackening before cooking. Dry them before frying.

We shallow fry the artichokes in olive oil – sunflower oil would also be good. See small frying pans on Amazon UK.

The trick to frying of artichokes is to have pre-heated the oil over a high heat (similar to fried eggs). The artichokes need to be turned constantly in the pan as they fry. After a short while the artichokes will start to bronze and crisp at the edges – this is when you know they are ready.

Fried-Artichoke-Recipe-Frying

Fried artichokes have a delicious crispy texture on the outside, whilst the inside flesh has a soft, subtle flavour. With luck, children will like them as it will remind them of chips, but with more flavour and the goodness of artichokes.

For more recipe ideas you may like to see our article on allotment recipe books.

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